Best Cinnamon Essential Oil Uses, Safety, and Recipes

Don’t you love the smell of cinnamon? That warm, inviting scent comes from plant material that also has a great deal of therapeutic properties, which can be found in the essential oil. Cinnamon is a very aromatic oil that can be a great addition to your home as long as it is used safely. Not sure what the best cinnamon essential oil uses are? Here are some tips and recipes to help!

Best uses for Cinnamon essential oil including safety information, recipes, and more!

Safety Considerations for Cinnamon Essential Oil

It is very important to use essential oils safely and always dilute to the proper amount. As I mentioned before, this is especially true for Cinnamon and when you try to use it topically. Do NOT make the mistake of using it unsafely because that can cause damage! (Precautions from Robert Tisserand’s Essential Oil Safety.)

Cinnamon Bark (cinnamomum verum or cinnamomum zeylanicum)

  • Better for cleaning solutions and diffusing (not in an inhaler due to possible mucous membrane irritation)
  • Not generally recommended for topical use due to the high percentage of cinnamaldehyde which is highly skin sensitizing and can be a mucous membrane irritant.
  • It can be used topically as long as it is at a dilution rate of 0.07% or lower. A 0.07% dilution rate = a drop of oil in 50ml of carrier (which is about 3.5 tbsp or 1.7 fl oz. of carrier).
  • Do NOT use Cinnamon Bark in any way when pregnant or breastfeeding.
  • Do not ingest Cinnamon or any other oil.
  • Do not diffuse around dogs or cats
  • Do not use before or just after surgery
  • Use caution especially in these situations: when using diabetes medication or anticoagulants, or if you have peptic ulcer, hemophilia, or other bleeding disorders

Cinnamon Leaf (cinnamomum verum or cinnamomum zeylanicum)

  • Better choice for topical use (only for a short period of time) when properly diluted.
  • Use topically at a dilution rate of 0.6% or lower. A 0.6% dilution rate = 5 drops of oil in 30ml of carrier (which is 2 tbsp or 1 fl oz.).
  • Do not ingest Cinnamon or any other oil.
  • Do not diffuse around dogs or cats
  • Do not use before or just after surgery
  • Use caution in these situations: when using pethidine, MAIOs or SSRIs, anticoagulants, or if you have have peptic ulcer, hemophilia, or other bleeding disorders

Cinnamon Cassia (Cinnamomum cassia)

  • Not generally recommended over Cinnamon Bark or Leaf. It’s cheaper, but doesn’t seem to provide any benefits over the other forms and requires even more caution for topical use. 
  • It can be used topically as long as it is at a dilution rate of 0.05% or lower. A 0.05% dilution rate = a drop of oil of oil in 60ml of carrier (which is about 4tbsp or 2 fl oz. of carrier).
  • Do NOT use Cinnamon Bark in any way when pregnant or breastfeeding.
  • Do not ingest Cinnamon or any other oil.
  • Do not use around dogs or cats
  • Do not use before or just after surgery
  • Use caution especially in these situations: when using diabetes medication or anticoagulants, or if you have peptic ulcer, hemophilia, or other bleeding disorders

What About Cinnamon Essential Oil for Children? 

There is a wide range of opinions about whether cinnamon should be used with children. Even though Cinnamon Bark can be safe for diffusing at low rates, several aromatherapy experts, including Tisserand, caution using it too much or too often in the diffuser because of the headaches and other sensitivity that it can cause, in some cases being potentially dangerous for children.

Given that, and the level of dilution required to keep it safe for topical use, we choose not to use Cinnamon oil in any form with kids younger than 10 other than very small amounts in diffused blends, and with caution even after that.  Alternatively, try using marjoram, lavender, tea tree, bergamot, and lemon in recipes that call for Cinnamon when you’re using it around children. 

12 Cinnamon Essential Oil Benefits and Uses

The cinnamon tree produces three different oils – bark, leaf and root. You’re most likely to encounter Cinnamon Bark or Cinnamon leaf (which is found in Flu Time).

Both should be used with extreme caution, particularly for topical use as they are known sensitizers and may cause a reaction on your skin. Any topical application should be a 0.1% or lower dilution rate, which is about 1 drop of Cinnamon per 30-40ml (40ml is about 1.35oz).

Also be sure on whether you are purchasing Cinnamon Bark, Cinnamon Leaf, or Cinnamon Cassia (which is not actually true cinnamon) when you’re considering usage and safety issues.

Following are 12 Cinnamon essential oil uses for this multifaceted, warming, and germ-fighting powerhouse! Remember, a little goes a long way. Cinnamon Bark has a higher possibility of skin reaction and is the better choice for diffusing and cleaning. It is is helpful for digestive issues (even in the diffuser). Cinnamon Leaf is the better choice for topical use especially useful for fighting of germs and infection as well as helping with arthritis. Cinnamon Cassia can be helpful during flu season and help with back pain. 

  1. Cleaner. Antibacterial properties make cinnamon an ideal addition to your home cleaners. Plus, it provides a change of pace from the typical lemon-fragranced cleaners.
  2. Gastrointestinal Stimulant. If poor appetite is an issue, consider using cinnamon as a stimulant.  
  3. Warming. Need a little heat in your life? Cinnamon is the perfect warming oil to use. Just make sure to use it sparingly due to its high probability of skin sensitization. Choose cinnamon leaf over bark to mitigate the risk. 
  4. Circulatory Agent. Cinnamon can be a great addition to your regimen if poor circulation is an issue. 
  5. Pain Relief. It’s analgesic properties make cinnamon ideal for pain blends. 
  6. Digestion. In addition to appetite stimulant, cinnamon can be used to help aid in digestion. Ingestion of oils should only be tried under care of a medicinal aromatherapy practitioner. But applying oils topically or inhaling, can still help with digestion. 
  7. Mood. Cinnamon has a way of uplifting those suffering from sadness or depression. 
  8. Debility. As people age, they can suffer from a general weakness that can cause illness. Cinnamon is thought to help ease this state, known as debility, and bring forth more vibrancy. 
  9. Flu Fighter. Cinnamon has amazing antimicrobial properties making it perfect for your flu and cold blends. 
  10. Aphrodisiac. Add cinnamon to your list of oils perfect for that 1 on 1 time with your partner. 
  11. Antispasmodic. If you suffer from muscle spasms, cinnamon’s antispasmodic properties can help alleviate discomfort. 
  12. Pest Repellent. It’s especially effective against silverfish, ants, and ear wigs. Add a few drops to a cotton ball and place where you’re seeing pests. Or create a spray of 8 oz water or rubbing alcohol and 10-15 drops oil. Shake well and spray where you see activity (see safety info and be cautious when spraying around pets and children). Repeat as necessary. 

Blends well in the diffuser with Clove, Frankincense, Lemon, Orange, Grapefruit, Geranium, Lavender, Black Pepper, and Tea Tree. 

Download 5 Recipes Based for Cinnamon Essential Oil Uses! 

We’ve put together some fantastic recipes for you so that you can get started using Cinnamon essential oil! I include some extra tips as well as substitution suggestions if you need them. Take a peek at the first one below and then enter your email address to get the rest delivered to you in a convenient download! 

Some Supplies You’ll Want to Consider: 

 

Download All 5 Cinnamon Essential Oil Recipes

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